Oilahuasca Theory

NOTE: THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS OUTDATED INFORMATION. UPDATES ARE PENDING.

The oilahuasca activation theory was originally put together by 69ron with the help of many other active forum members of herbs.maxforum.org and www.drugs-forum.com who also took part in most of the human tests done which have shown the oilahuasca activation theory appears to be a working model. The theory is still evolving as new information arrives. The current theory incorporates some elements that originated from Oswald and Peele's activation theory, as well as research by many other individuals.

The current oilahuasca theory states that all allylbenzenes must first be converted into alcohols by hydroxylation of either the 1 position of the tail or the 3 position, and then converted to either phenyl vinyl ketones or aldehydes which then condense with dimethylamine, pyrrolidine, or piperidine to form one of three corresponding alkaloid metabolites.

Many enzymes are present in humans which cause allylbenzenes to form inactive metabolites. In some people these inactive metabolites far out number the active ones, leading to little or no activity. While in others their digestive systems consistently form the active alkaloid metabolites in abundance, leading to psychoactivity.

Compounds that help activate these allylbenzenes are collectively referred to as oilahuasca activators. In essence these activators work by inhibiting enzymes which prevent activation while inducing enzymes that help activation.

The current oilahuasca theory states that the Cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2E1, and sometimes CYP1A2 help activate allylbenzenes, and therefor should be induced. The primary enzymes to inhibit are CYP2D6, CYP3A4 and sometimes CYP1A2. This forces 1'-hydroxylation, and possibly 3'-hydroxylation of the allylbenzene tails turning them into alcohols.

Once the allylbenzenes are in their 1'-hydroxylated alcohol form, they are vulnerable to attack by UGT and SULT, so these must be inhibited so that they can then be converted to phenyl vinyl ketones by the action of 17bHSD2. If they are in their 3'-hydroxylated form they can still probably be attacked by UGT and SULT, so these should probably be inhibited so that they can be turned into aldehydes by a currently unknown enzyme action (probably also the action of 17bHSD2).

Once the allylbenzenes are in their phenyl vinyl ketone form they can be inactivated by the action of GST and probably aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and related enzymes. Therefore these enzymes should be inhibited. Another stumbling block present is possibly aldose reductase. This enzyme converts aldehydes back into alcohols and might do the same for phenyl vinyl ketones. Therefore aldose reductase should also probably be inhibited.

If allylbenzenes are in their aldehyde form, they can be inactivated by conversion into carboxylic acids by several enzymes which may include aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and related enzymes. Therefore these enzymes should be inhibited. Another stumbling block present is aldose reductase. This enzyme converts the aldehydes back into alcohols. Therefore aldose reductase should also be inhibited. GST is likely to also be a problem and should be inhibited.

The final step in activation is to provide piperidine, pyrrolidine, or dimethylamine for the phenyl vinyl ketones or aldehydes to condense with. If piperidine, dimethylamine, or pyrrolidine are not present, alkaloids cannot form, and the phenyl vinyl ketones or aldehydes are eventually metabolized into other inactive compounds.

For proper oilahuasca activation we therefore must have 17bHSD2 induced, supply NAD+ for 17bHSD2 as a coenzyme, induce the P450 enzymes CYP2A6, CYP2C9, and CYP2E1 (and sometimes CYP1A2) while inhibiting all other P450 enzymes, inhibit UGT, SULT, GST, aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and aldose reductase, and we must supplement with piperidine, dimethylamine, pyrrolidine, or similar amines.

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